HARRISBURG – The United States Attorney’s Office for the Middle District of Pennsylvania announced today that Keion Griffin, age 23, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was indicted on July 11, 2018, by a federal grand jury on drug trafficking and firearms charges.According to United States Attorney David J. Freed, the indictment alleges that Griffin possessed with intent to distribute cocaine base and marijuana on April 15, 2017, in Swatara Township. The indictment also alleges that Griffin possessed multiple handguns in furtherance of drug trafficking.The case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Swatara Township Police Department. Assistant U.S. Attorney Carlo D. Marchioli is prosecuting the case.This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.Indictments are only allegations. All persons charged are presumed to be innocent unless and until found guilty in court.A sentence following a finding of guilt is imposed by the Judge after consideration of the applicable federal sentencing statutes and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.The maximum penalty under federal law for this offense is imprisonment for life, a term of supervised release following imprisonment, and a fine. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the Judge is also required to consider and weigh a number of factors, including the nature, circumstances and seriousness of the offense; the history and characteristics of the defendant; and the need to punish the defendant, protect the public and provide for the defendant's educational, vocational and medical needs. For these reasons, the statutory maximum penalty for the offense is not an accurate indicator of the potential sentence for a specific defendant.

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President Donald Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh for a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court drew a mixed reaction on Tuesday — all of it on predictable partisan lines.

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Gov. Tom Wolf told a reporter in Philadelphia that he wants all state public school subsidy money run through a “fair funding formula” set in a bill he signed in 2016 rather than limit that formula to new educational funds approved since fiscal 2014-15.

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WASHINGTON — The president, who might not be fully acquainted with the pertinent Supreme Court case law, says the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel was unconstitutional. The president’s opinion, because it is his, is prima facie evidence for the opposite conclusion. It is, however, not sufficient evidence. Consider the debate between two serious people who have immersed themselves in the history of the Appointments Clause, which says: